Sustainable Farming Fund Funded Projects

Successful 2011 SFF Projects > 25k

Successful 2011 SFF Projects < 25k

No. Project Title Executive Summary Project Manager/
Contact Person
SFF Contact
11/006 The NZ Arable Industry - using knowledge to create better opportunities for the future The future sustainability of NZ’s arable industry is reliant on improved productivity and profitability. Currently the industry is hampered by a lack of information on grain volumes and movements, which impacts adversely on growers' ability to plan. The project objective is to develop an information strategy and plan of action that addresses the shortfalls in the existing information flows, to provide current industry statistics enabling confident planning for all players. Nick Pyke
03 325 6353
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/010 Integrating Winter forage crops versus pasture: managing the environmental risk Yield management and input cost reduction are crucially important to NZ’s Wine Industry as it undergoes a supply/demand correction. Exciting recent research into mechanical thinning for yield management showed it could be a cost effective long-term, late season, alternative to yield management and it can also reduce Botrytis bunch rot levels indicating its potential as an economic tool for crop-load management and as a non-chemical disease control option. This project will deliver to New Zealand grape-growers through seminars, workshops, field days and publications new cost effective technology and new knowledge to achieve target yields and juice composition while positively affecting disease risk. Andy MacLeod Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/013 Uncovered Stand-off Facility Design and Management Design and use of stand-off facilities is not meeting farmer expectations in terms of costs and durability of surface materials. However, more farmers are using uncovered stand-off facilities in response to the need to manage pastures, recycle nutrients and reduce nutrient loss from excreta, in addition to their use for supplementary feeding of herds. This project will develop guidelines for uncovered stand-off facility design and management. More knowledge will allow production of a practical tool for use by farmers, builders, and advisors. This will assist farmers implement facilities optimising system profitability and environmental sustainability while safeguarding cow welfare. Chris Glassey
07 859 1163
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/016 Preparing for River Co Management: Low impact farms in action This group of farmers in the upper Waikato catchment operate productive properties with lower than average environmental impacts. They are supportive of revier comanagement but wish to understand how this may influence agricultural practices in the future. The project will look in detail at a range of farm systems, quantifying their physical and financial performance and their relative environmental impacts. Alison Dewes
021 2424949
www.headlandsenviro.co.nz
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/023 Meeting nutrient loss targets on dairy farms in the Lake Rotorua catchment The Rotorua Dairy Collective, made up of 25 dairy farmers, is working with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council, DairyNZ, AgResearch and Federated Farmers to achieve a reduction in nutrient discharge rates in the Lake Rotorua catchment. Major constraints to success will be addressed by: (1) Establishing a Model Farm on which current nutrient losses, and the reduction from key management actions, will be measured; (2) Utilising tools and models that demonstrate the application of cost-effective options for achieving change on individual farms; and; (3) Establishing 3 Focus/Discussion Groups to build capability among the farmers to adopt new technologies and implement change. Tanira Kingi
06 351 8335
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/026 Design and testing of a management protocol to reduce exposure of dairy stock to Facial Exzema spores This project will construct and test a management protocol aimed at reducing the exposure of dairy herds and replacements to Facial Eczema spores. It will assess data available on the timing of build up and location of spores in dairy pastures, and then test a protocol that allows farmers to act and customise this information to control exposure to spores on their farm. High Facial Eczema prevalence areas such as Waikato and BoP will then be targeted for improving farm management systems. Resulting improvements in animal health and productivity will lead to improved economic and social sustainability in those regions. Jo Sheridan
07 871 9028
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/034 Forage Footprints in Dairy Wintering in Canterbury There is an urgent need to balance increases in dairy industry productivity and profitability with reductions in environmental impacts such as soil degradation, greenhouse gas emissions and pollution of ground water and water ways in South Island dairy farming regions. Winter feeding practices receive relatively little attention yet they represent one of the biggest opportunities to increase productivity and are also a source of significant environmental impacts. The cost and environmental footprint of current practices of forage production and conservation will be compared in three typical systems operating in the Canterbury environment. We propose to explore the differences in water, N and C footprints for the forages used on these farms to improve estimates of overall system footprints. The proposed research will focus on Canterbury but have wider application to the South Island, and thus approximately 40% of New Zealand’s current milk production. Ron Pellow Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/035 Beating Black Beetle: developing pest-resistant dairy pastures in the Waikato The impact of Black Beetle on pasture production in the Waikato and throughout the northern North Island is significant. However, many farmers and rural professionals do not understand the problem or know how to combat it. This project will contribute to the development of a communication program to inform farmers and the wider industry of the factors that result in damaging populations and how to minimise future pasture losses. On-farm trials of best-practice endophyte/cultivar selection, establishment and pasture management will clearly demonstrate how to develop more productive and persistent pastures in Black Beetle-prone areas and the resulting benefits. This project forms a key link in a program of industry-lead initiatives. Martin Henton
07 824 6655
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/039 Fair trading of Grass and Wholecrop forages Currently there are no standards by which to measure or trade pasture and whole crop forages (market size estsimated at $250m pa). Due to the lack of science behind forage sampling, even the most robust sampling procedures cannot provide evidence of the accuracy of the amount of forage determined. Consequently forages can be unfairly traded and even the most thorough forage sampling procedures cannot provide proof of accuracy.This project aims to provide a national standard for the fair trading of pasture and whole crop forages. Deane Carson
03 218 8850
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/041 After the field day – Maximising deer industry technology extension Evaluation of the Focus on Deer newsletters (an earlier SFF project) showed increased uptake of the best practice promoted through focus farms when supported by follow up communication. This project will determine what variety of communication options will ensure the focus remains on making a difference and how to best transfer the messages to those who weren’t at the field day? The development of a national Focus farm programme is a first step in improving this technology transfer. This project will package and promote information on a single topic, first delivered through Focus farm field days nationally, and then in different ways to the wider deer farming community. The project will evaluate novel and innovative ways of information delivery, understand which are the most effective, and design systems to enhance delivery of these key messages. Marie Casey
03 470 0316
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/042 Sow Farrowing - Freedom Crates ThePork Industry has experienced publicity regarding the housing of sows in stalls and to a lesser extent the use of sow crates for farrowing. Waratah Farms has refitted its operations replacing sow stalls with group housing and are will install freedom crates (for farrowing) in two existing farrowing rooms and will monitor the productivity and output, compared to data from traditional methods. Martin Ellis
07 873 7752
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/047 Trees on farms workshops Trees on farms provide positive environmental and economic benefits but barriers to new plantings include uncertainty of how trees enhance overall farm productivity and carbon opportunities. New non-traditional farm forestry audiences will be reached through Young Farmers, Rural Women, Landcorp and AgFirst networks. The three year workshop series has a strong team of nationally-recognised tree experts and farm consultants hosted by 26 NZFFA branches and Tane’s Tree Trust. The synergy from bringing these experts together combined with regional video clips (pod casts) and the collation of existing information will provide new confidence to farmers contemplating trees on their land. Ian Nicholas
07 348 5923
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/048 The Design & Implementation of a FSC Group Scheme for Small Forest Growers Environmental certification is a strategic market access issue for the New Zealand Forest sector. It is also expected that the sale of NZU’s or carbon from forests will focus attention on the certified environmental credentials of those forests. Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification has not been widely adopted by the Small Forest Grower as it is prohibitively expensive and excessively complicated. This project will develop and implement an easily accessible FSC Group Scheme, using the recently developed Small Low Intensity Managed Forests component (earlier SFF Project) of The NZ Plantation Forestry Standard. This is a lower cost and simpler certification option now available to Small Forest Growers with less than 1000ha. Patrick Milne
03 312 6599
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/049 Biological control for pampas (Cortaderia jubata and Cortaderia selloana) in New Zealand Pampas grasses are serious invasive weeds of forestry, natural and waste areas, and road and rail corridors in NZ and is continuing to spread at an alarming rate displacing native toetoe in some areas. This project aims to explore whether biocontrol could be developed for pampas in NZ looking for potential biocontrol agents in its native South America and fungi found on pampas in NZ. Kit Richards
07 921 7206
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/051 Postharvest Thrips Disinfestation of Apricots Expansion of NZ's apricot market relies on the ability to ensure fruit is free of quarantine pests with thrips remaining the single largest control issue. To fulfill the strategic plan it is essential to eliminate this quarantine pest from export fruit, without recourse to agrichemicals and without adversely affecting fruit quality. This innovative project will compare non-toxic ethyl formate-based vapour treatments, and pyrethrum-based products for their effectiveness in eliminating live Thrips from apricot fruit postharvest. Selected treatments will then be developed to a commercial level and integrated with other sustainable preharvest and postharvest management practices aimed at producing fruit free of toxic residues. Marie Dawkins
04 494 9975
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/053 Registration of sustainable agrichemicals for minor crops This project brings together growers, agchem companies and ACVM to address the issue of registration of agrichemicals for minor crops. The group will develop and refine current policy for registration to make it more efficient, less costly and more achievable to small industry groups. The project will result in registration of agrichemicals for participating minor crops and allow them to reduce reliance on older, less environmentally friendly options and will provide options to compounds being removed from sale. Resultant policies will allow the groups to undertake future research to continue addressing the issue and enable them to continue producing quality domestic and exported fruit and vegetables. Nikki Johnson
04 473 6040
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/054 Midge-free apples for high value export markets Apple leafcurling midge (ALCM) is pest with major implications for New Zealand’s apple exports. It was raised by Australia in the ‘Apples to Australia’ WTO dispute and this has raised the quarantine significance of ALCM so it impacts on exports to Taiwan, China and other emerging markets. This project team will develop an integrated, ‘systems” approach that will reduce fruit infestation of ALCM to negligible levels and thereby eliminate ALCM as a quarantine pest. Dr Mike Butcher
06 873 7086
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/055 Biological solutions for beetle control Apple production in New Zealand is increasingly challenged by insect pests through changing residue and production requirements in export markets and control of beetles has emerged as a major problem for the sector. Fruit lost to the bronze neetle is crippling organic apple production and is now impacting on conventional growers. The goal of this project is to develop an effective biological control that will target both adult and larval stages of bronze beetle in orchards which will develop a pathway for biological insecticides for horticulture in NZ. Dr Mike Butcher
06 873 7086
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/058 Developing IPM tools for psyllid management in potato The tomato potato psyllid and the associated zebra chip disease have cost the potato industry at least $46 million in each of the last 2 seasons. Growers have responded by applying insecticides on a calendar basis. These heavy insecticide inputs are not sustainable financially or environmentally. The industry wants to move towards a more sustainable IPM programme, but realises that this may take many years. In the short term, research is needed to enable growers to reduce insecticide inputs. The research programme focuses on evaluating non-chemical controls, lengthening intervals between insecticide treatments, and development of a resistance management strategy. This will be an important step towards developing an IPM programme for potato psyllid. Dr Stephen Ogden
04 473 6040
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/060 Sustainable Maori land-use through crop rotation and integrated pest management Taewa were grown by Maori pre the arrival of Europeans and consequently a diverse knowledge and history of taewa production is held by Māori. Production systems have not altered greatly with the use of lunar calendars and companion planting being prevalent today. However, most grower members of this group are small, community-based enterprises and have limited opportunities to expand their production base. This project brings together traditional practices and commercial knowledge to devise methods for increasing or maintaining taewa yield whilst minimising adverse effects on the land and environment through soil management and integrated pest and disease management plans. Nick Roskruge
027 206 6850
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/062 Decision Support Tool for Sustainable 2025 Kiwifruit Industry Growth Market demand projections have shown the potential to triple export earnings from the kiwifruit industry by 2025 through increased quality, productivity and expansion of the planted area. This project will develop a tool to allow industry stakeholders to assess the suitability of potential kiwifruit production in current and future growing regions. The proposed tool will be designed as an online decision-making tool to evaluate the impact of different orchard location options enabling industry expansion to occur in terms of economic, environmental and social gains while reducing risks posed by climate change. Alistair Mowat
07 572 7798
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/068 Leptospirosis in livestock: stakeholder awareness and improved profitability Leptospirosis impacts on the economic and social sustainability of rural communities through adverse effects on animal health, growth and reproduction, and serious human disease. Disease control increases profitability in deer farming, but this new information is not yet widely disseminated. The cost benefits of leptospirosis control on productivity of sheep and beef cattle need to be determined for farmers to make informed decisions. This 3-year project focuses on informing farmers by (a) disseminating existing and new information about leptospirosis to stakeholders (extension); and (b) establishing the impact of leptospirosis on sheep and beef cattle and the economic assessment of control measures (new knowledge development). Joan Black Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/074 Enabling Climate Science to Improve Confidence in on-Farm Decision Making Farm performance is inextricably linked to adverse weather events and climatic conditions which are expected to become more frequent in the future. Farmers who currently undertake weather observations will engage with NIWA, PGGW and other stake holders to develop better ways of presenting and describing farm weather and climate risk for improved on-farm decision making. The project will enable farmers throughout the country to corroborate and add context to their own weather data/observations and will produce improved tools to strengthen farmer knowledge and confidence in climate-dependent decision making around the purchase/sale of stock and sourcing supplementary feed, and could save farmers tens of millions during major droughts.

Neil McLaren
06 370 1865

Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/076 Environmental Best Practice in Agricultural and associated Rural Aviation This project will work with stakeholders, including Councils, to develop guidance on environmental best practice for fertiliser, agrichemical and bait applications within the aviation industry. Sustainable agricultural aviation requires environmental best practice. Objectives in this project include development of relevant, practical, and achievable environmental performance standards for agricultural aviation in regional and district plans that are consistent, accessible and understood by operators through the development of tools for councils developing plans under the RMA and information provision and dissemination. Beneficiaries of the simpler, more effective regulatory regime include Councils, aerial operators, their clients and the public. John Maber
07 8298 121
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/077 AgriKidsNZ This project aims to develop and implement a strategy and framework which underpins the DairyNZ PGP project – Leadership Pipeline; through AgriKidsNZ activities and network.The project will develop a nationwide agricultural competition event series with a supporting network for primary school aged children. The project exposes urban participants and their families to positive agricultural messaging which will build a positive view of agriculture and awareness of agriculture as a key contributor to New Zealand’s success. Emma Aker
03 303 3057
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/083 Sustainable Perennial Pastures In Northland there is a history of ryegrass based pastures not persisting due to summer moisture stress, summer heat, varying insect pest population, pugging damage during wet winters. Aupouri peninsula farmers with sandy soils and drought prone climate, face greater persistence challenges then any other area within New Zealand. Research has shown that perennial ryegrass and tall fescue with their appropriate and relatively new, endophytes, offer greater persistence than what has been available in the past. These new perennial grasses will be established and ongoing monitoring will be undertaken of all factors affecting plant persistence and seasonal dry matter yields. Number of surviving grass tillers and levels of endophyte infection will be measured annually to access persistence and a successful project will give local farmers increased confidence to undertake pasture renewal, in this challenging Northland environment. Gavin Ussher
09 408 6133
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/089 Persistent Pastures - Best-Practice Renewal for Performance and Sustainability Many Waikato & Bay of Plenty farmers rated the failure of renewed pastures to persist, as the most important issue affecting their farming sustainability. An earlier SFF project provided the COI with greater confidence to establish new pastures. This project will quantify the return on investment to date, and add further value by specifically addressing persistence. A key aspect of this new project will be to determine factors critical to longer-term (post-establishment: 2-3 years) performance, including endophytes. Stuart McHardy
07 304 9672
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/091 Efficient fertiliser use on humps & hollows on the West Coast Dairying is an important and rapidly growing contributor to the West Coast economy. Modifying unsuitable land for dairying using ‘hump and hollowing’ to improve drainage has enabled the industry to expand. However, new solutions are required to overcome major changes in soil properties and low soil fertility. This project will equip farmers with novel approaches to improve fertiliser use efficiency by recommending ways to maximise pasture production on humps and hollows that will reduce the cost of producing milk and minimise environmental impacts. Uptake, supported by extension experts and farmers’ networks, will enable dairying to be sustained in the region. Steve Thomas
03 325 9635
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/092 Biological control for tutsan (Hypericum androsaemum) in New Zealand Tutsan is a serious weed which has begun to spread alarmingly throughout New Zealand with the cost to the Ruapehu district alone estimated at $27m pa. This project will undertake overseas and local surveys to determine natural enemies, identifying the most promising, potential biocontrol agents and recommending a costed programme of work for developing them further. Rosalind Burton
07 895 8052
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/095 Nassella tussock - an intergrated management approach Nassella tussock infests over 524,000 ha of pastoral land on 1,881 South Island properties and $2.7m is spent pa on its control. In this project, two regional councils, a large community of interest and scientists will work together to develop an integrated approach to the management of this weed (the outcome). The objectives are: (1) develop a comprehensive understanding of the weed and its response to grubbing; (2) evaluate the soon-to-be-registered herbicide Taskforce (flupropanate) in Canterbury; (3) extend the new knowledge via an innovative communication programme. Laurence Smith
03 314 9035
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/097 Wairarapa Sheep Internal Parasite Anthelmintic Trial Increasingly farmers are turning to expensive animal health remedies to try to recover stock health and condition in the face of adverse climatic events. However, expensive worm treatments which may yield a short-term production benefit may also threaten the long-term sustainability of their farming operation. This dilemma is heightened by a substantial lack of independent information on the likely production benefits of using long-acting products, and a number of significant questions have never been addressed.
The objective of this proposal is to acquire robust and independent data, under a range of commercial conditions, to answer questions on these issues for all sheep farmers. We have carried out a literature review which confirms that no research in NZ has been conducted on anthelmintic use at this level .
Chris Garland
06 378 8174
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/101 ‘Finished by 20 months’ Improving liveweight gain in young cattle leads to increased feed conversion efficiency, better meat quality traits, lower carbon emissions/kg project, less treading damage (fewer cattle seeing a second winter) and higher profitability. Northern NZ sub-tropical grasses make it difficult to achieve 'normal' liveweight gains between January/July whereas farms in other parts of the country use alternative pasture species, forage crops or supplements to dramatically improve cattle liveweight gain. This project describe how high performing farmers are achieving high cattle growth rates, conduct on-farm trials to determine cost and benefits of alternative feed options and demonstrate alternative management options. Chris Boom
027 488 4463
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
11/104 Future Farming Systems for East Coast Dryland Changing climatic conditions have resulted in four consecutive autumn droughts on the East Coast of the North Island raising questions about the sustainability of many farms in this region. Consequently, it is crucial that we evaluate new technologies to allow the development of more resilient and profitable farming systems adapted to the changing climatic conditions. Our group seeks to evaluate a wide range of new forage and farm system technologies, the most successful of which will then be integrated into whole farm systems, tested and demonstrated within farm cluster groups. These technologies will be showcased within these farm clusters and enable dissemination to the wider farming community. These farm clusters will also provide the framework for integrating technologies into a Demonstration Farm. Although this project will be run initially on the East Coast, it will provide a national template as a powerful tool for information transfer to farmers. Paul Muir
03 357 0692
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
11/110 New opportunities for sustainable grape thinning Yield management and input cost reduction are crucially important to NZ’s Wine Industry as it undergoes a supply/demand correction. Exciting recent research into mechanical thinning for yield management showed it could be a cost effective long-term, late season, alternative to yield management and it can also reduce Botrytis bunch rot levels indicating its potential as an economic tool for crop-load management and as a non-chemical disease control option. This project will deliver to New Zealand grape-growers through seminars, workshops, field days and publications new cost effective technology and new knowledge to achieve target yields and juice composition while positively affecting disease risk. Dr Simon Hooker
09 306 5556
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/111 Organic Focus Vineyard Project A growing number of winegrowers are converting to organic viticulture throughout New Zealand. These producers urgently need practical models of organic management to guide them through organic conversion, and the industry needs reliable information on the costs and benefits of organic growing. This project will meet those needs through in-depth extension and monitoring. Focus vineyards in three major winegrowing regions will shift part of their land to certified organic management, with professional growing advice provided and costs, vineyard health, and crop quality tracked throughout the three-year transition process. Information will be shared continuously through vineyard walks and online reports to enable winegrowers nationwide to understand and practice the organic production pathway. Rebecca Reider
027 359 4522
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
11/118 Hill Country Irrigation - Knowledge into Practice Unique challenges exist for successful irrigation of hill country. Rolling topography combined with variable soils and aspects create complexity and adopting ‘flat-land’ irrigation system design has resulted in lower production and poor environmental performance. Increased irrigator knowledge and support and new solutions are urgently needed; otherwise the viability of both hill country irrigators and irrigation schemes will be compromised. This project will collate existing GMP irrigation information for hill country farmer irrigators, identify knowledge gaps and explore new solutions, ultimately providing a comprehensive design and management guide. Importantly this project will also work alongside existing and developing Lower Waitaki schemes helping them to better achieve noticeable change where it counts - on the ground. Andrew Curtis
03 379 3820
Claire Scott
03 943 3703

Successful 2011 SFF Projects < $25k

No. Project Title Executive Summary Contact/
Project Manager
SFF Contact
L11/119 Single pass planting systems for maize - Removing the adoption barriers This project aims to increase the adoption rate of reduced tillage for maize by building confidence through an innovative "hands-on" extension model that capitalises on farmers preferences of learning by doing. Regional practitioner groups will learn about reduced tillage systems through on-farm practice, trial and refinement, supported as required with appropriate technical expertise. Extension to the wider group will be through demonstration, and fence watchers will be encouraged to participate. Diana Mathers
06 877 9435
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/120 Where to with the birds, the bees and the bugs on arable farms? This project will identify and deliver clear immediate outcomes in three key interelated areas to arable farmers and develop a coherent and complete R&D stratedgy addressing beneficial insets and pest species that form part of the biodiversity on arable farms. The outcomes from the R&D statedgy will form the basis for ongoing investment to ensure the profitability and productivity of the sustainable future farm systems. Nick Pyke
03 325 6353
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/124 Non chemical weed control for sustainable rotations This project will investigate non chemical control options for grass weeds in cropping rotations. This project will compare burning, ploughing, minimum tilage, delayed planting and silage as management practices to reduce farmer reliance on chemicals for the control of weeds. Richard Chynoweth
03 325 6353
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/127 Optimising Nutrient Use In the Piako-Waihou catchment This scoping study will set up a demonstration farm to investigate and demonstrate methods that will reduce nutrient loading of the Waihou and Piako catchments by looking at technology which would allow better decisions around tactical nutrient applications including Nitrogen and Phosphate and in particular aim to reduce Nutrient leaching and loss. In particular to look at the potential through monitoring soil Nitrogen to reduce the amount of nutrients applied so that N and P is only applied in areas and at times where there is greater potential to improve yield and thereby maintain pasture production with a lower nutrient loading. The results would be monitored through various models including Overseer to look at what changes are achieved in nutrient leaching compared with benchmarks for the area . Nick Pool
03 325 6353
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/129 Feasibility assessment of spiny snout mite as a biocontrol for clover flea The aim of this project is to assess if NZ farmers should commit themselves and industry resources to the effort required to introduce and distribute the spiny snout mite Neomolgus capillatus from Tasmania where it is a successful introduced biocontrol agent for clover flea in dairy pastures. Lorraine Bilby
07 887 7852
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/130 Drenching strategies for replacement heifers in large herds Building on a previous SFF project to reduce drench usage and reduce animal health costs in dairy calves, this project will further develop the system to ensure animal health is not compromised and production losses are minimal. The project will develop practical, cost effective programmes for nematode worm control in dairy calves. Robin McAnulty
(03) 325-3838 x 8625
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/133 Best practice free range pork production In response to increased demand for free-range pork this project will examine the best free range farming practices both in New Zealand and overseas and produce a freely available guide to free range pig farming. Sam McIvor
04 917 4754
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/137 Revitalising Deer Industry Environment Management Activities This project captures the experience and leadership of key sustainable management individuals in the deer industry to produce a new style industry resource, both written and web based. It will feature practical demonstration of EMS including; risk assessment, best practices and planning and implementing the mitigating actions required. Edmund Noonan
03 358 8718
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/139 Salvaging data from historical beech thinning trials The project will salvage valuable data and related documentation from historical thinning and pruning trials and make them available for use. Recent analyses have demonstrated the potential of these trials to provide useful estimates of gains in tree growth, timber yield, and carbon sequestration that result from thinning and pruning. The consequences of thinning and pruning in a wide range of beech species, stand ages, and sites will in turn result in practical silvicultural prescriptions that can be used by beech forest owners and managers. Tomás Easdale
03 321 9877
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/140 Mass tree propagation technologies for tomorrows plantation forest industry Some 35 million P.radiata trees are planted each year and to realise the potential of new elite genetic material sthis project will explore development of an alternative fertiliser regime that promotes root development and nutritional status in seedlings and cuttings. Jace Carson
03 364 2688
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/141 Establishment of a thinning trial in a planted kauri stand and initiation of the continuous cover process This project will undertake thinning in a block of planted kauri (originally established to test various fertilizers, seedling sizes etc) and should benefit the growth rates of the remaining trees, the objective being to determine the growth response of residual trees, relative to trees in unthinned plots, and how long the increased growth rate will continue. The potential of kauri for continuous cover management will also be assessed. Timber from thinnings will be tested for strength, density, and their carbon sequestration rates. Ian Barton
09 239 2049
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/142 Farm Forestry Timbers: Local growers for local markets This project proposes to establish and develop a brand and centralised marketplace for NZ grown specialty timbers by developing 1) an online database and virtual community connecting growers/sellers to buyers/markets; 2) detailed online information resources on handling and processing of timbers for highest value recovery, with an emphasis on how growers can optimise value from and add value to their resource; and 3) an online timber "showcase" displaying and promoting the attributes of each specialty timber. Dean Satchell
09 407 5525
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/143 Produce a kauri calculator A recently completed growth model has shown that the productivity of planted kauri stands is much higher than previously thought, rivalling Douglas-fir and cypress in some warmer areas of New Zealand. This proposal is to use the new growth model to produce a kauri growth calculator – this will allow growers to evaluate the timber and carbon potential of the species for a range of sites. The calculator will include log grade recoveries and an economic analysis that will enable landowners to seriously evaluate growing kauri as a forest option. Patrick Milne
03 312 6599
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/145 Biological control agents for the guava moth, Coscinoptycha improbana Guava moth larvae infest a range of soft fruit and nuts year-round, developing within the fruit so insecticidal control options are limited. No natural enemies have been found in New Zealand and other management techniques for this pest have failed to control guava moth. This project intends to discover and identify natural enemies of guava moth in Australia is the first step in a classical biocontrol programme for the long term sustainable management of this insect. Don McKenzie
09 438 4639
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/149 Postharvest Developments for Export of Feijoa The feijoa industry needs to access export markets in order to maintain profitability but current refridgerated storage systems are inadequate for the transport and marketing times involved. This project will explore whether complementary technologies of 1-MCP and CA offer potential to extend the storage life and aid access to potential export markets. This project will establish whether these technologies offer potential value for the industry and warrant further investment to establish industrial methods of application. Ian Turk
04 939 8440
Tim Harper
09 573 6968
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/150 Assessing the cost of crop loss at paddock scale This project will develop a simple approach for growers to value yield suppression and loss within crops, and assess the potential value and benefits of mitigation.
Measurement protocols, recording templates and calculation guides to determine the economic value of crop losses will be produced, validated and tested with a focus group.
In-field demonstrations of techniques will be run in three vegetable producing regions. Growers will be encouraged to use the method to assess crops on their own properties. Follow-up workshops will allow growers to confirm their use of the method was correct, and allow a forum for discussion of causes and solutions.
Dan Bloomer
06 876 6630
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/152 Macadamia Grower Co-operative To establish an Organic Macadamia Grower Cooperative for growers of the new imported commercial dropping varieties to collect and analyse crop yield data, kernel recovery, whole kernel percentage and quality for each of the new varieties. This data will help identify the best producing macadamia varieties for different regions and locations in NZ for all existing and future macadamia growers. Vanessa Hayes
06 867 2621
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/154 Best practice guidelines for kamokamo using Matauranga Maori This scoping project will investigate key factors in kamokamo (Cucurbita pepo) production and construct 5 broadsheets for growers outlining recommended crop production practices, including detailed agronomic aspects of kamokamo production, including land preparation, planting and nutrition, weed management, pests and diseases, harvest and seed production and postharvest storage. A further SFF application for national dissemination may result if this project is successful. Nick Roskruge
02 720 66850
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/158 Tainui Wahine tu mai, tu atu I nga Maunga teitei (Tainui Women in Agribusiness) This project will develop agribusiness management skills for Maori women trustees, and for woment who may become trustees. The objectives are for Tainui women to become competent and confident in the language and tools used in primary sector land management and governance within a Maori context and to comunicate their perspective to others; and to use this as a pilot programme for the development of resources and programmes that can be used across a variety of trusts and people groups. Ruth McLennan
04 381 0865
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/159 Sustainable Drain Management in Selwyn-Waihora – healthy waterways within productive land This project will provide practical tools and support for farmers and drain managers to promote sustainable drain management in Selwyn-Waihora, leading to healthy, clean waterways within productive land while preserving their drainage function. Adrienne Lomax
03 353 9712
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/162 Biological farmers online communications platform A growing number of NZ farmers are adopting biological farming techniques to reduce reliance upon soluble nitrogen and phosphorus inputs while building soil carbon. This project is an online service to help foster the successful growth of the sector, through resources, information, networking and mentoring opportunities. The industry is growing rapidly but with little strategic focus and this project is a catalyst for the growth of a new industry body. Nicole Masters
06 858 7860
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/164 Hua Parakore Sector Pilot Hua Parakore is a verification system for a Māori agricultural productsuch verification enabling Māori agribusiness to realise the economic benefits of indigenous branding and the environmental and cultual benefits of maintaining the traditions of the ancestors. This pilot project focuses on the dairy, apiary, aquaculture and fibre sectors and wil support 4 case study producers through the verification process with information being made available for uptake by other Maori producers. Data from each case study is compiled into sector specific resources to support the uptake of Hua Parakore by other Māori producers. Percy Tipene
0272559362
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/167 Lake Weeds and worm farms- A “kaitiaki” solution for sensitive catchments This large Maori farm trust located on the shores of Lake Rotoehu, is working with EBOP and industry to combine 3,000 tonnes of harvested lake weed with 6,000 tonnes of pulpmill in vermicomposted windrows. This project will measure and monitor the nitrogen footprint of the vermicompost windrows and if the technology is environmentally safe with a low nutrient footprint, a permanent vermicomposting operation on the farm may be possible with replication for other sensitive lakes and waterways catchments in Rotorua and the Waikato region. Tony Whata
07 362 4311
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/168 Is there useful variation in NZ kikuyu grass? As temperatures rise and winter frosting decreases, Kikuyu is becoming an increasingly dominant pasture species particularly in Northland. This proposal seeks to determine whether there is sufficient genetic variation to support selection for genetic improvement of forage quality with resultant increased production from kikuyu dominant pasture. Helen Moodie
021 816 365
Louise Askin
04 894 0446
L11/172 Green thistle beetle monitoring to spread the biocontrol attack on Californian thistles This project will survey the extent of establishment of the green thistle beetle since its first releases in New Zealand in 2007. Aalready there is evidence that a developing population of beetles are beginning a successful attack on Californian thistles. We will monitor and record the thistle and beetle situation at the release sites. This will educate farmers and others in the rural community as to the sustainability of biocontrol, and to facilitate further distribution of the beetles and a widening of the attack from the best of the established sites. Malcolm Deverson
03 418 3188
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/175 Targeted use of bioactive forages as a curative treatment for organic lambs This project seeks to provide and then build on the necessary background information needed to develop practical, cost effective programmes for nematode worm control in lambs grazing in organic systems.
In a collaborative project between the Organic industry and NZ research providers we will identify and then remove individual animals suffering from parasitism and subsequently graze them on bioactive forages to provide a chemical free method of reducing the impact of parasitism. It is anticipated the proposed study will lead to the provision of a sustainable and agronomically robust method of parasite control in organic systems.
Robin McAnulty
(03) 325-3838 x 8625
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/177 On-farm management of lambs to improve and control meat quality by managing meat pH This is a scoping project to test the practicality and benefits of implementing higher welfare standards and growth rates on-farm; to find if there are relationships between growth rate, meat pH and carcass yield and the variability of growth rate between farms and between lambs, with the ultimate goal of developing a branded product. Six Canterbury farms will manage lambs during the 4 weeks prior to slaughter according to standards which will be higher than the current industry standards and then next season the practices will be rolled out on more farms for further testing and improvement. John Chapman
03 303 9734
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/180 Developing local Food Economies The concept “local food economy” refers to the emergence and growth of community-based agriculture and food production activities that meet consumer demands for fresh, safe, locally produced foods, job creation, innovative entrepreneurship, enhanced environmental assurance and a strengthening of community identity. This project will quantify demand for local meat food systems in two Otago centres, seeking to understand the most important attributes of such a system. Rhys Miller
03 477 9242
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/182 Analysis of mechanisation of defoliation for reducing cluster compactness and rot incidence and of the carry-on effects of early defoliation on fruitfulness This project will look at both the possibility of using mechanical defoliation to reduce set and rot incidence, as well as an investigation of the carry-on effects that early defoliation this season (2010-11) has on vine fruitfulness in the 2011-12 season. Lyn Bevin
06 876 3418
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/183 Tendrils as a source of seasonal carryover of Botrytis cinerea in vineyards Potential savings of $2.5 to $5 million pa for the wine industry could be made by not removing tendrils during pruning. There is little evidence to suggest that this practice reduces disease risk and this project will evaluate the risk tendrils pose as a disease risk in vineyards and provide the industry with access to the research results. Simon Hooker
09 306 5556
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/184 Financial Benefits of Site Specific Vineyard Management – preliminary case studies Hawke’s Bay produces high quality wine in a marginal climate and high production costs and intense financial pressures mean returns must be maximised and spending carefully targeted. Vineyard zones with different yield potentials can be differentially managed but Zone identification, and development of appropriate management suystems is expensive. This project will assess the economics of zonal management using case study vineyards and discussion groups to plan zonal vineyard management strategies and assess their economic costs and benefits. Dan Bloomer
06 876 6630
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/185 Sustainable sheep leaf plucking Sustainable sheep leaf plucking. Carla Emms
06 872 7089
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/187 Pre-feasibility study into the future water supply options for the Raukokore district The objective of this project is to enable the applicant group to make an informed decision relating to options for the supply, allocation and efficient use of water for the farming community in Raukokore, which is about 5km SW of Waihau Bay in the Bay of Plenty. The project will carry out a pre-feasibility investigation to look at options for extraction, storage and reticulation of water from the Raukokore River to supply 150-200 domestic users with water and to enable irrigation of high-value crops such as kiwifruit on 1200-2000 ha of land. Bryan Riesterer
07 315 6165
Claire Scott
03 943 3703
L11/188 Satellites for improved irrigation advice This proposal will use innovative satellite imaging to reliably expand the limited information available from moisture probes to whole fields or even farms, at a relatively low extra cost, providing greater efficiency to irrigation application. Gerald Hope
03 577 2377
Janine Alfeld
03 943 3802

Amanda Evans
03 943 1784
L11/189 PDevelopment of an Irrigation Installation Training Qualification This project (building on an earlier SFF project) will further the on-going development of a comprehensive resource to enable Good Management Practice irrigation in NZ. The final package will encompass codes of practices, training and an industry accreditation system for Design, Installation, Operation & Evaluation. This project partners with industry and AgITO to identify, develop and register an NZQA Irrigation Installation qualification and its associated unit standards to enable the future development of appropriate training resources and assessments. Andrew Curtis
03 379 3820
Claire Scott
03 943 3703

 

Last Updated: 22 May 2012

Related Items

No related resources found

Contact MPI

for general enquiries phone

0800 00 83 33