Meat Industry to Adopt Latest in Food Safety Programmes

1 September 1997

The New Zealand Meat Industry Hygiene Council (MIHC) agreed at its August meeting that all New Zealand export meat companies would adopt Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programmes.

HACCP programmes require that producers document their processes; identify the points where food safety hazards exist and then take appropriate steps to manage the risks those hazards present. It places responsibility for the safety of food produced on the producer, and should result in safer food for consumers. Internationally, HACCP is being adopted in a number of industries and the United States has recently introduced wide ranging mandatory requirements for HACCP by meat processors. Other countries are expected to follow with their own requirements.

"The decision by the MIHC is a sound one and, in moving to take this responsibility, an indication of the maturity of the New Zealand industry. I am particularly pleased it was made voluntarily, without Government intervention", says New Zealand's Chief Meat Veterinary Officer, Dr Andrew McKenzie of the Ministry of Agriculture's Regulatory Authority.

"With the increasing consumer emphasis on food safety and recent major events internationally associated with contaminated foods, HACCP programmes provide by far the most reliable means by which companies can be certain of the safety of the products they produce.

"New Zealand has an exemplary food safety record. While it would be naive to think any methodology could produce food with no food safety risks, the introduction of HACCP programmes will ensure we continue to be well positioned to meet the demands of increasingly food safety conscious consumers and regulators world wide," said Dr McKenzie.

For further information contact:
Sandra Newman, Executive Manager, MAF Regulatory Authority, Telephone: (04) 4744100, or
Andrew McKenzie, Chief Meat Veterinary Officer, MAF Regulatory Authority, phone (04)4744100.

  

 

Last Updated: 09 September 2010

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