Top 5 food safety factors

The Food Act 2014 is all about managing risk. To help you work out what to focus on, MPI has identified the top 5 food safety factors for different types of businesses.

Focus on minimising your biggest risks

Food businesses do different things, so what's most important when it comes to food safety isn't always the same.

We've identified the top 5 food safety measures you need to focus on for your type of business. These aren't all you need to do to comply with the law – but they are the things that your verifier will pay most attention to.

Manufacturers of confectionery (NP2)

Allergens can kill: Even small traces on equipment and surfaces can cause an allergic reaction. Image of confectionery labelled with walnuts and nut free.
  1. Get the right staff training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  3. Keep allergen food separate.
  4. Clean and sanitise – to stop bugs spreading.
  5. Wash your hands properly.

These food safety factors are for companies manufacturing confectionery, chocolate and icing (includes icing pre-made cakes).

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 2 MB]

Bakeries that prepare or manufacture bread or bread-based products only (NP2)

Baker next to truck thinking about whether ingredients are safe and at the right temperature, and if they can trust their supplier
  1. Get the right staff training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Cook food at the right temperature to kill bugs.
  3. Source/receive safe ingredients – use trusted suppliers.
  4. Clean – to stop bugs spreading and control pests.
  5. Wash your hands properly.

This sector includes businesses that bake bread or bread products, including fruit loaves, bagels, pita bread, and quick breads, but not cakes or pastries.

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 2.3 MB]

Retailers of packaged chilled and frozen food, excludes ice cream and iced confectionery (NP2)

Food displayed in freezer with text 'Bugs on packaging may be spread onto food inside when opened'
  1. Get staff training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  3. Source/receive safe ingredients – use trusted suppliers, operate good stock rotation.
  4. Clean – to stop bugs spreading.
  5. Hand hygiene - wash your hands properly.

This is for those who sell (but don’t make) packaged chilled and frozen food (like chilled or frozen meat, fish and dairy products, frozen meals or meal ingredients such as frozen vegetables). If you only sell ice cream and iced confectionery (ice blocks) you can do this at NP1.

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 2.1 MB]

Retailers who handle food (but do not prepare or manufacture food) (NP3)

Pie oven with text 'Hold food at 60 degrees or more. Throw away food below this for more than 2 hours.'
  1. Get staff training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  3. Keep cooked, raw and allergen food separate (but only if offering non-allergenic alternatives).
  4. Clean – to stop bugs spreading.
  5. Wash your hands properly (keep hands clean).

This is for retailers that handle food, but don't make it. it includes activities such as scooping ice cream and reheating and holding hot manufacturer-prepared food (like pies, pizzas), re-packaging food for retail sale, and greengrocers trimming produce for display.

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 2 MB]

Manufacturers of food additives, processing aids, vitamins, minerals and other nutrients to be added to food (NP3)

Allergens including peanuts, soy beans, dairy, cereals with gluten, eggs, sulphites, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, sesame seeds and lupin
  1. Get the right staff training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Limit the amount of moisture in food to protect it from bugs.
  3. Know what's in your food – so customers know what they are buying.
  4. Clean and sanitise – to stop bugs spreading.
  5. Wash your hands and don't go to work sick.

This top 5 is for manufacturers of food additives and processing aids like food colourings, rising agents, intense sweeteners, vitamins or minerals (to be added to other foods), yeasts and cultures.

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 1.8 MB]

Manufacturers of non-alcoholic beverages (NP3)

Pasteurisation temperature and time combinations
  1. Get the right staff training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  3. Keep foreign matter (like glass) out of your products.
  4. Clean and sanitise – to stop bugs spreading.
  5. Wash your hands and don't go to work sick.

This sector includes makers of sodas, juices, kombucha and other non-alcoholic drinks.

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 1.8 MB]

Producers of herbs and spices (NP3)

Mould can cause aflatoxin poisoning, which can damage the liver and even cause death
  1. Get staff training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Limit the amount of moisture in food to protect it from bugs.
  3. Keep foreign matter (like glass) out of your products.
  4. Source/receive safe ingredients – use trusted suppliers.
  5. Wash your hands properly.

A top 5 for businesses that produce herbs or spices (including loose tea).

 

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 2 MB]

Food service businesses like restaurants and cafes

Handwashing graphic
  1. Get the right training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Clean and sanitise – to stop germs spreading.
  3. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  4. Keep cooked, raw and allergen food separate.
  5. Wash your hands properly.

Food service businesses include restaurants, cafes, caterers, food trucks, and other organisations that make and serve food, like schools, hospitals or rest homes.

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 3.3 MB]

Early childhood education services

Bacteria can survive on average 20 minutes to 2 hours on hard surfaces
  1. Get the right training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Clean and sanitise – to stop germs spreading.
  3. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  4. Keep cooked, raw and allergen food separate.
  5. Wash your hands properly.

These food safety factors are for early learning centres, kindergartens or kōhanga reo that make and serve food.

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 3.3 MB]

Manufacturers of non-shelf-stable sauces, spreads, dips, and soups

Stop bugs increasing: cold, make acidic, salts, sugars, preservatives
  1. Get the right training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Clean and sanitise – to stop germs spreading.
  3. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  4. Have controls in place to stop bugs growing.
  5. Source safe ingredients – use trusted suppliers.

This top 5 list is for manufacturers who make products like hummus, fresh soup, or pasta sauce that isn't shelf-stable and needs to be kept cold.

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 2 MB]

Manufacturers of ready-to-eat salads

E. coli, Salmonella and Listeria in raw salad vegetables
  1. Get the right training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Wash product – it reduces bugs and chemicals.
  3. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  4. Keep cooked, raw and allergen food separate.
  5. Source safe ingredients – use trusted suppliers.

These are the top food safety factors for making packaged salads, including fruit and vegetable salads and those with additional ingredients, like meat or cheese.

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 3.4 MB]

Manufacturers of food for vulnerable people

Pregnant women are 20 times more likely to get Listeria.
  1. Get the right training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Control Listeria – it can be deadly for vulnerable people.
  3. Cook and store food at the right temperature.
  4. Keep cooked, raw and allergen food separate.
  5. Be hygienic – wash your hands and don't go to work sick.

These factors apply to those who manufacture packaged meals or foods for babies, frail, elderly people, pregnant women, and those with weakened immune systems.

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 3.5 MB]

Processors of nuts, seeds and coffee

Number of cases of Salmonella in peanut butter in the USA
  1. Get the right training – know how to keep food safe.
  2. Clean and sanitise – bugs are everywhere.
  3. Storage – store correctly to prevent bugs.
  4. Keep foreign matter (like glass) out of your products.
  5. Source safe ingredients – use trusted suppliers.

This list is for businesses that roast coffee beans, nuts or seeds, coat nuts, or make processed nut or seed bars.

 

Find out more about the top 5 – download the poster [PDF, 3.3 MB]

Most foodborne disease is caused by poor hygienic practices and improper handling of food.

— World Health Organization

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