Sources of foodborne illness

MPI's research documents relating to attribution of human illness to food sources.

Attributing foodborne illnesses to a source is important for implementing controls to minimise illness and control outbreaks. 

The projects that make up the Human Health Surveillance science programme provide knowledge about the sources of most foodborne illnesses and how often they can be attributed to foods, the environment, direct animal contact, or human-to-human exchange.

Attribution of potentially foodborne enteric diseases: Human salmonellosis — An epidemiological approach
Report
Dynamic modelling of Campylobacter sources in the Manawatu
Report
Enhancing surveillance of potentially foodborne enteric diseases in New Zealand: Human campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu
Report
Enhancing surveillance of potentially foodborne enteric diseases in New Zealand: Human campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu (final report)
Report
Expert elicitation-derived estimates of foodborne proportions of enteric illnessesMPI
Technical paper
NZFSA Agreement 11777, Schedule 1A Source attribution July 2009 to June 2010 of human Campylobacter jejuni cases from the Manawatu
Report
Review of microbial pathogen inactivation relevant to sous vide cooking at temperatures below 55°C
Technical paper
Source attribution for salmonellosis using microbial subtyping
Technical paper
Source attribution January to December 2014 of human Campylobacter jejuni from the Manawatu
Technical paper
Source attribution January to December 2015 of human Campylobacter jejuni cases from the Manawatu
Technical paper
Source attribution January to December 2016 of human Campylobacter jejuni cases from the Manawatu
Technical paper
Transmission routes for campylobacteriosis in New Zealand
Report
Trialling and evaluation of epiclustR to detect potential Campylobacter outbreaks
Technical paper
Use of epidemiological evidence in investigations of foodborne disease outbreaks
Technical paper
Last reviewed:
Has this been useful? Give us your feedback