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Review of sustainability measures for selected fish stocks – April 2022 round

29 March 2022 – Minister's decision

Following this consultation, the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries has made decisions on sustainability measures for selected fishstocks as part of the April 2022 sustainability round.

We have released:

  • the minister's decision letter and advice papers
  • submissions we received
  • summaries of the decisions for each stock

Minister's decision letter and advice papers

Minister for Oceans and Fisheries decision letter [PDF, 544 KB]

Review of sustainability measures for the 2022 April round Fisheries New Zealand decision paper [PDF, 5.4 MB]

Review of Rock Lobster sustainability measures for 2022/23 final advice paper [PDF, 2.4 MB]

Submissions received during this consultation

Large representative bodies and organisations [PDF, 27 MB] 

Rock lobster and scallop stocks [PDF, 27 MB]

Scallop stocks only:

Hapuku/bass and multi stocks [PDF, 16 MB]

Summary table of the minister's decisions

Species

Stock (area)

Change

Decision summary

Rock lobster

CRA 1

Northland

  • Decreases TAC from 203 tonnes to 193 tonnes
  • Decreases TACC from 110 tonnes to 105 tonnes
  • Decreases recreational allowance from 32 tonnes to 27 tonnes
  • Retain customary allowance at 20 tonnes
  • Retain allowance for other mortality caused by fishing at 41 tonnes

CRA 7

Otago

  • Increase TAC from 126.2 tonnes to 134.5 tonnes
  • Increase TACC from 106.2 tonnes to 111.5 tonnes
  • Retain recreational allowance at 5 tonnes
  • Retain customary allowance at 10 tonnes
  • Increase allowance for other mortality caused by fishing

CRA 8

Southern

  • Increase TAC from 1282.7 tonnes to 1453 tonnes
  • Increase TACC from 1191.7 tonnes to 1251 tonnes
  • Retain customary allowance of 30 tonnes
  • Retain recreational allowance of 33 tonnes
  • Increase allowance for other mortality caused by fishing from 28 tonnes to 139 tonnes

Scallops

SCA CS

Auckland and Coromandel

 

(s11 closure)

  • Decrease TAC from 81 tonnes to 19 tonnes
  • Decrease the TACC from 50 tonnes to 5 tonnes
  • Decrease recreational allowance from 10 tonnes to three tonnes
  • Retain customary allowance of 10 tonnes
  • Decrease allowance for other mortality caused by fishing from 11 tonnes to 1 tonne
  • Partial spatial closure (section 11) of SCA CS to the harvest of scallops, except for within 2 defined areas, one around Little Barrier Island and one in the Colville Channel

SCA 1

Northland

(s11 closure)

  • Decrease TAC from 30 tonnes to 8.5 tonnes
  • Decrease TACC from 10 tonnes to 0 tonnes
  • Decrease recreational allowance from 7.5 tonnes to 0 tonnes
  • Retain customary allowance of 7.5 tonnes
  • Decrease allowance for other mortality caused by frishing from 5 tonnes to 1 tonne
  • Full closure (section 11) of SCA 1 fishery for commercial and recreational harvest

Hāpuku/Bass

HPB 7

West Coast South Island and

  • Set TAC at 150 tonnes
  • Decrease TACC from 235.5 tonnes to 97 tonnes
  • Set recreational allowance at 28 tonnes
  • Set customary allowance at 20 tonnes
  • Set allowance for other mortality caused by fishing at 5 tonnes
  • Interim deemed value rate decreased from $2.55 per kg to $2.27 per kg

HPB 8

Taranaki

 

  • Set TAC at 76 tonnes
  • Decrease TACC from 80.1 tonnes to 55 tonnes
  • Set recreational allowance at 8 tonnes
  • Set customary allowance at 10 tonnes
  • Set allowance for other mortality caused by fishing at 3 tonnes
  • Interim deemed value rate increased from $1.96 per kg to $2.27 per kg

The minister has also agreed to initiating the regulatory process to modify recreational rules for these hāpuku and bass stocks including:

  • introducing a daily catch limit of no more than 2 hāpuku and/or bass per person
  • removing these stocks from the combined daily catch limit of 5 with kingfish
  • introducing an accumulation limit of 3 HPB for trips over a period of more than one day.

 

Deepwater stocks

Species

Stock (area)

Change

Decision summary

Redbait

RBT 7

West coast South Island and west coast North Island

 

  • Decrease TAC from 2,991 tonnes to 421 tonnes
  • Decrease TACC from 2,841 tonnes to 400 tonnes
  • Retain recreational allowance of 0 tonnes
  • Retain customary allowance of 0 tonnes
  • Decrease allowance for all other mortality caused by fishing from 150 tonnes to 21 tonnes
  • Interim deemed value rate decreased from $0.45 per kg to $0.25 per kg

Southern blue whiting

SBW 6B

Bounty Platform

  • Decrease TAC from 2,888 tonnes to 2,309 tonnes
  • Decrease TACC from 2,830 tonnes to 2,264 tonnes
  • Retain recreational allowance at 0 tonnes
  • Retain customary allowance at 0 tonnes
  • Decrease allowance for all other mortality from 58 tonnes to 45 tonnes

Background to this consultation

Fisheries New Zealand reviews catch limits for selected stocks twice a year. This is consistent with the requirement that Fisheries New Zealand ensures the sustainable use of fisheries resources.

The proposals for each stock in this round were assessed:

  • in the context of the relevant statutory requirements
  • using the best available information, including the latest scientific information on the status of the stocks and tangata whenua and stakeholder input.

We wanted your feedback about the proposed sustainability measures.

Full details were in the consultation documents and this web page also had a summary of the proposals

This consultation opened on 14 December 2021 and closed on 8 February 2022.

Consultation documents

Review of sustainability measures for scallop (SCA 1 and SCA CS) for 2022 [PDF, 2.9 MB]

Review of sustainability measures for rock lobster (CRA 1,7 and 8) for 2022 [PDF, 1.9 MB]

Review of sustainability measures for hapuku/bass (HPB 7 and 8) for 2022 [PDF, 1.3 MB]

Review of sustainability measures for redbait (RBT 7) for 2022 [PDF, 581 KB]

Review of sustainability measures for southern blue whiting (SBW 6B) for 2022 [PDF, 752 KB]

Related and legal information

Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act 2000 – NZ Legislation

About the Quota Management System (QMS)

The Harvest Strategy Standard

Operational guidelines for New Zealand's Harvest Strategy Standard [PDF, 843 KB]

The Deemed Values Guidelines [PDF, 1.4 MB]

Glossary of relevant terms

National Fisheries Plan for deepwater and middle-depth fisheries [PDF, 1.4 MB]

Fisheries assessment plenary November 2021 [PDF, 23 MB]

Overview of legislative requirements and other considerations in relation to sustainability measures [PDF, 153 KB]

Fisheries Act 1996 – NZ Legislation

If you require hard copies of documents or any other information, email FMSubmissions@mpi.govt.nz

Summary table of the proposals

Stocks proposed to have their catch limits, allowances, and deemed values reviewed as part of the 1 April 2022 sustainability round.

Stock

Proposal

Rationale for review

Rock lobster – CRA 7 and 8

Otago and Southland

Rock lobster is a highly valued shared stock, and one of the most valuable wild-caught inshore fisheries, earning ~$200M in exports annually.

Recent stock assessment results suggest that the stocks are above the BMSY reference level, is predicted to increase under current catches, and could sustain up to a 15% increase to the TAC. An increase to the TACC is proposed to allow fishers to realise this utilisation opportunity.

Rock lobster – CRA 1

Northland and Wellington/Hawke’s Bay

A rapid assessment update for CRA 1  suggest that this stock will stay just above its BMSY reference level with current catches. A small decrease to the TAC is proposed to increase the certainty that this stock continues to increase in biomass above the reference level.

Scallops – SCA 1 and SCA CS

Northland, Auckland and Coromandel

 

Surveys carried out in 2021 show an overall decline in the biomass and abundance in both SCA 1 and SCA CS from historical levels, with substantive declines in many core scallop beds since the previous survey. Fisheries New Zealand considers that the current biomass and abundance of scallops in SCA 1 and SCA CS are at levels that do not support sustainable fishing at the current catch limits and allowances. Management options are proposed to help rebuild the fishery.

Hāpuku/Bass – HPB 7 and HPB 8

West Coast South Island and Taranaki

HPB 7 and 8 consists of 2 groper species (both with an October fishing year) - hapuku and bass. HPB 7 and 8 have not been reviewed since it was introduced into the QMS in 1986. Commercial catch of both stocks has been trending downwards since 2015/16 and is now substantially lower than the TACC (<50% of the TACC). HPB 7 and 8 are a low information stock with no accepted index of abundance. Reviewing the stocks would allow TACs and allowances to be set, and give due consideration to whether current catches are sustainable. This follows a similar review for other North Island HPB stocks (HPB 1 and 2) in the October Round.

Redbait – RBT 7

West coasts of the South and North islands

 

RBT 7 is a low knowledge commercial species that occurs throughout the New Zealand Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Redbait in RBT 7 is predominantly caught as a bycatch species of the Jack mackerel trawl fishery on the West Coast South Island. Annual catch landings of redbait have decreased from 1,700 tonnes in 2007 to less than 30 tonnes in recent years. This substantive decrease has not been attributed to a similar degree of reduction in Jack mackerel targeted fishing effort. The TACC is currently set at 2,841 tonnes and has remained unchanged since 2009.

Southern blue whiting – SBW 6B

Bounty Island

The agreed management approach for SBW 6B involves recommending catch limits based on the application of a harvest control (or decision) rule to the results from an annual abundance survey for the stock. This approach was introduced in 2017 but due to logistical issues (bad weather, timing, and inability to locate a stable spawning aggregation), this survey has not produced a biomass estimate for the last 4 years. Fisheries New Zealand is proposing a precautionary decrease to the commercial catch limits of this stock.

Despite this, preliminary fish length data from samples taken in the recent fishing season indicates recruitment into the fishery.  However, until this data is analysed, the strength of this new year class is unknown. As such, Fisheries New Zealand is proposing a precautionary decrease to the commercial catch limits of this stock.

Submissions are public information

Note that all, part, or a summary of your submission may be published on this website. Most often this happens when we issue a document that reviews the submissions received.

People can also ask for copies of submissions under the Official Information Act 1982 (OIA). The OIA says we must make the content of submissions available unless we have good reason for withholding it. Those reasons are detailed in sections 6 and 9 of the OIA.

If you think there are grounds to withhold specific information from publication, make this clear in your submission or contact us. Reasons may include that it discloses commercially sensitive or personal information. However, any decision MPI makes to withhold details can be reviewed by the Ombudsman, who may direct us to release it.

Official Information Act 1982 – NZ Legislation